Now let’s compare to an “average” concentration of THC in some of the cannabis flowers that we use to make our oil (we’re using whole numbers to make it easy to follow). For the sake of argument, let's say that we use flowers with a potency of 10% THC (on a fully decarboxylated basis). This means that each gram of cannabis flowers contains 100 mg THC (1 gram = 1000 mg, 1000 mg x 0.1 = 100 mg). Theoretically we would have to use 10 grams of flowers to equal 1000 mg of THC (which is what we have in our 50 mL bottles). But this process is not 100% efficient (nothing ever is!). So we have to account for extraction efficiency during cannabis resin production, plus losses from decarboxylation, dilution, and packaging.
Dosage is important, because CBD can have side effects—the most common are tiredness, diarrhea, and changes in appetite and weight—so it’s best not to take more than you need. As CBD becomes more prevalent, says J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., a psychiatrist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, “I’m reasonably certain new kinds of side effects will emerge.”
Despite this, it's important to know that inflammation is not inherently bad; in fact, it's a brilliant aspect of our immune system. When balanced, inflammation heals wounds and fights off infections. The problem with inflammation arises when it increases and never calms down. Like a forest fire burning on in perpetuity, people get hurt. Same goes with the fiery squall of insidious, chronic inflammation. As a natural anti-inflammatory, CBD can help quell the flame and fight chronic inflammation.
At this point, I could basically write a book about the best (and worst) ways to biohack your anxiety, so I was more than willing to give CBD oil a shot. For this story, I tried eight different varieties of CBD oil over the course of eight days and recorded how I felt. Each day, I took the CBD oil around the same time—always depositing the same dosage under my tongue and waiting 60 seconds before swallowing—and went about my day. Here are my favorites, how they worked (OK, and tasted), and which you should consider buying.
Serotonin: Most people associate serotonin with happiness. However, the role of this neurotransmitter is very complex, and its effects depend on where it is and what it binds to. (Contrary to popular belief, more serotonin is not necessarily better — dysfunction can stem from low or high levels of serotonin, as well as from malfunctions with their receptors.) Serotonin has at least 14 different receptors, but CBD specifically binds to 5-HT1A which is thought to have the strongest role in anxiety disorders. The anti-anxiety drug buspirone also binds to this particular receptor, which explains the anti-anxiety effects of CBD on rats exposed to stressful situations.
No, hemp oil is not the same as cannabis oil. All-natural hemp oil is obtained by cold pressing of hemp seeds whereas cannabis oil is obtained by separating the resins from cannabis flowers. Their uses and chemical composition are quite different. Cannabis oil is much higher in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) content, which has certain effects, whereas hemp oil tends to be higher in CBD (cannabidiol) levels.
In order to create a system where oils can be provided to patients when the original prescription is expressed in grams of dried product, each Licensed Producer must provide an ‘Equivalency Factor’. This allows you to see how much oil you can purchase to be in line with your prescription and ensures that you do not go over your prescribed allowance. For example, a 60ml bottle of Blueberry Lamsbread Cannabis Oil, which has an equivalency factor of 12 ml of oil to 1 gram of dried cannabis, will use 5 grams of your possession limit.
Our hemp oil is cold pressed and cold filtered with no added preservatives or dyes. Each 15-millilitre serving (1 tablespoon) contains 10 grams of omega-3 and omega-6. The light, nutty taste is perfect drizzled over veggies, on pasta, or even on your popcorn for movie night. You can also add it to salad dressings, sauces, dips, and shakes. Use this light green oil as a substitute for other oils in recipes that aren’t heated above 300 °F (150 °C). Not recommended for frying.
From a pharmacological perspective, Cannabis' (and CBD's) diverse receptor profile explains its potential application for such a wide variety of medical conditions. Cannabis contains more than 400 different chemical compounds, of which 61 are considered cannabinoids, a class of compounds that act upon endogenous cannabinoid receptors of the body [11]. Cannabinoid receptors are utilized endogenously by the body through the endocannabinoid system, which includes a group of lipid proteins, enzymes, and receptors that are involved in many physiological processes. Through its modulation of neurotransmitter release, the endocannabinoid system regulates cognition, pain sensation, appetite, memory, sleep, immune function, and mood among many other bodily systems. These effects are largely mediated through two members of the G-protein coupled receptor family, cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2)[12, 8]. CB1 receptors are found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, with the majority of receptors localized to the hippocampus and amygdala of the brain. Physiological effects of using cannabis make sense in the context of its receptor activity as the hippocampus and amygdala are primarily involved with regulation of memory, fear, and emotion. In contrast, CB2 receptors are mainly found peripherally in immune cells, lymphoid tissue, and peripheral nerve terminals [9].
Extinction learning: One way we get over anxiety is through “extinction learning,” or learning to let go of triggers when there’s nothing left to fear. These experiments often train test subjects to associate something harmless with something painful, and then measure how long it takes to stop fearing the harmless trigger after they stop delivering pain. This is particularly relevant for people suffering from PTSD:
Cannabis oil refers to any concentrated extract made from cannabis. Cannabis oil can technically come from either hemp or marijuana, since both are varieties of the cannabis plant, but it typically refers to oil made from marijuana, which contains a much higher level of THC than hemp. Cannabis oil that comes from marijuana is highly regulated in the US and across the world. Federal law makes cannabis oil illegal, but cannabis oil is legal in states allowing for recreational usage, as well as states that allow for medicinal use with a doctor’s prescription.
“DEA will continue to support sound and scientific research that promotes legitimate therapeutic uses for FDA-approved constituent components of cannabis, consistent with federal law,” acting DEA administrator Uttam Dhillon said in a press release. “DEA is committed to continuing to work with our federal partners to seek ways to make the process for research more efficient and effective.”
LEGAL NOTICES: Care By Design products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. This information should not be interpreted as medical advice or treatment. You should consult your physician or other health care professional before starting any medication or supplements. Further, Care By Design does not manufacture, sell or distribute any products that are in violation of California State Law.
CBD exerts several actions in the brain that explain why it could be effective in treating anxiety. Before we dive in, it’s important to note that most research describing how CBD works is preclinical and based on animal studies. As the saying goes, “mice are not men” — and, results from animal studies don’t always neatly transfer to human therapies. However, preclinical studies provide insights that move us in the right direction:
“The brain has these receptors that respond to endocannabinoids, which are neurotransmitters that are naturally produced in the body and brain,” says Jerald Simmons, a neurologist at Houston’s Comprehensive Sleep Medicine Associates. “Some of the cannabinoids in the marijuana plant are very similar to the endocannabinoids in the brain, and they act on the same receptors.”
Cannabidiol is currently a class B1 controlled drug in New Zealand under the Misuse of Drugs Act. It is also a prescription medicine under the Medicines Act. In 2017 the rules were changed so that anyone wanting to use it could go to the Health Ministry for approval. Prior to this, the only way to obtain a prescription was to seek the personal approval of the Minister of Health.
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