‘There is intriguing preclinical and some clinical data supporting the use of cannabidiol (CBD) as an effective treatment for the management of anxiety disorders,’ says Dr Ware. ‘There are more than 30 preclinical studies that investigate the anxiolytic [anxiety-reducing] properties of CBD. These studies generally support the position that CBD has an effect on reducing anxiety behaviour.’
– CBD Oil with THC; This kind of oil isn’t legitimate in all states and has an unexpected impact in comparison to unadulterated CBD oil. Numerous individuals take marijuana for THC, which aids them to fight distinctive restorative conditions. They trust that when the two are joined, they give a better experience that surpasses each other’s useful properties. Note that THC can counter the advantages of CBD and in this way, perfect dosing is fundamental.
It's important to know that although THC and CBD are the most studied components of cannabis, there are many more chemical compounds found within the plant, such as cannabigerol (CBG), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabidivarin (CBDV), tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), terpenes, and flavonoids. While there is still much to learn about these other chemicals, researchers in Israel have discovered that whole-plant cannabis extracts that contain these other chemicals are more beneficial than isolated extracts that contain just CBD or THC.

In general, the human body has specific sites that are allotted to cannabinoids, called the cannabinoid receptor sites. Receptors are mechanisms to which the cannabinoids naturally present in the human body as well as the ones artificially ingested/ applied attach themselves. There are two kinds of receptors for cannabinoids, the CB1, and the CB2. While the CB1 receptors are present in the brain, the CB2 receptors can be found in the immune system.


The ECS is responsible for setting the baseline activity levels of our immune system and nervous system, which then work to maintain our health. When the ECS falls out of whack, the systems that are regulated by it can begin to malfunction. CBD promotes the normal health and function of the endocannabinoid system, so it’s possible that CBD can help to alleviate the symptoms of conditions that are caused by dysfunction of the endocannabinoid system.
Well, apart from day to day anxiety that most of us suffer with, anxiety is actually a very complex disorder, which can be at times extremely paralyzing and debilitating. According to recent data published by the National Institute of Mental Health, Anxiety disorders affect 19.1% of adults in the United States in any given year. Furthermore, it is estimate that 31.1% of American adults experience any anxiety disorder at some time in their lives.

First comes CBD, then comes the oil. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid, or chemical compound, found in both cannabis and hemp plants, explains Kimberly Cargile, the Executive Director of medical marijuana dispensary A Therapeutic Alternative. “There [are] hundreds of cannabinoids in the cannabis plant and hemp plants, and [CBD] is one of them,” she says.

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) within the human body helps to regulate many important functions such as immune system response, pain, appetite and sleep. The body produces neurotransmitters or endocannabinoids which bind to cannabinoid receptors in the nervous system. It has been shown that CBD will reduce pain as it impacts the endocannabinoid receptor activity, interacts with neurotransmitters and reduces inflammation. Research shows that CBD injections reduce the pain of surgical incision in rats and that it also reduces inflammation and nerve pain. Humans studies showed that it is also effective in treating the pain of arthritis and multiple sclerosis sufferers.
The equivalency factor is not designed to compare the effects of cannabis oil to dried cannabis, or provide dosage information. For many patients, consuming cannabis orally will produce much stronger effects than inhaling it. For example, when considering a product that has an equivalency factor of 12ml of oil to 1 gram of dried cannabis, and a patient who usually consumes 1 gram of dried product a day, this patient will likely use less than 12 ml of oil per day. Even for patients who have previous experience of using cannabis oil, it is recommend that you start with a low dose and go slow.

Reality: Hemp oil is an increasingly popular product, used for an expanding variety of purposes. The washed hemp seed contains no THC at all. The tiny amounts of THC contained in industrial hemp are in the glands of the plant itself. Sometimes, in the manufacturing process, some THC- and CBD-containing resin sticks to the seed, resulting in traces of THC in the oil that is produced. The concentration of these cannabinoids in the oil is infinitesimal. No one can get high from using hemp oil.

CB2 receptors are predominantly expressed by cells in the immune system and are traceable at low-density levels in the brain (microglia, the brain stem) and in the keratinocytes of the skin. Like the CB1 receptors, they also belong to the G-protein-coupled receptors. When they are activated a signaling cascade is set into motion (inhibition of adenylate cyclase, intracellular calcium release, inhibition of the potassium efflux), which eventually leads to a modulation of neuronal excitability.
Extensive studies have demonstrated that many common illnesses are related to deficiencies or imbalances of specific fatty acids in the body. Symptoms are often related to a lack of Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids and their derivatives, the postaglandins. Most people eating a healthful diet, one that includes a balanced ratio of essential fatty acids, also have healthy skin and a strong immune system. Yet some individuals may experience shortages in specific fatty acids or their metabolites due to dysfunctional enzyme systems or other inhibitions in their metabolic pathways caused by genetic, immune-system-related, or even environmental factors. It has been proven in several clinical studies that dietary supplementation with essential fatty acids or their metabolites (such as GLA) will often prevent or even cure these illnesses. Since hemp seed oil contains both essential fatty acids in a desirable balance while also providing two of the essential fatty acid metabolites, it is a good resource for the prevention and treatment of certain illnesses.
Hemp oil or Hemp Oil contains essential fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that are required for brain development. DHA is crucial to the health of the brain as well as the retina of the eye, particularly in the first year of life. Mothers who supplement with hemp oil during pregnancy may provide brain- and eye-protective benefits for the developing baby.
I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
CBD exerts several actions in the brain that explain why it could be effective in treating anxiety. Before we dive in, it’s important to note that most research describing how CBD works is preclinical and based on animal studies. As the saying goes, “mice are not men” — and, results from animal studies don’t always neatly transfer to human therapies. However, preclinical studies provide insights that move us in the right direction:

I have read about studies from Europe (not very specific I know) that suggest CBD might work better for some people if combined with some level of THC. Also, the getting high part can be helpful, although not for everybody, of course. A second point – I don’t hear very much about CBD eliminating or almost eliminating pain for people with severe pain. Helpful, but, so far at least, it doesn’t seem that CBDs can replace opioids or substantially reduce pain for all chronic pain patients. Maybe someday.

This is a critical area for new research. While there is preliminary evidence that CBD may have therapeutic value for a number of conditions, we need to be careful to not get ahead of the evidence. Ninety-five percent of drugs that move from promising preclinical findings to clinical research do not make it to market. The recently announced elimination of the PHS review of non-federally funded research protocols involving marijuana is an important first step to enhance conducting research on marijuana and its components such as CBD. Still, it is important to try to understand the reasons for the lack of well-controlled clinical trials of CBD including: the regulatory requirements associated with doing research with Schedule I substances, including a requirement to demonstrate institutional review board approval; and the lack of CBD that has been produced under the guidance of Current Good Manufacturing Processes (cGMP) – required for testing in human clinical trials – available for researchers. Furthermore, the opportunity to gather important information on clinical outcomes through practical (non-randomized) trials for patients using CBD products available in state marijuana dispensaries is complicated by the variable quality and purity of CBD from these sources.
CBD was first discovered in 1940 by Roger Adams, a prominent organic chemist at the University of Illinois. Shortly thereafter, other scientists began testing isolated cannabinoids on lab animals; notably, Walter S. Loewe ran trials on mice and rabbits with the cannabinoids THC, CBD and CBN. He found that CBD produced no observable effects in the animals’ behavior while THC caused, what he called, a “central excitant action” in rabbits. Despite science’s movement forward, scientists were completely unaware of the cannabinoids’ chemical structure, so no one could tell which specific compound resulted in which effect.
At sufficient doses (400-600 mg), CBD can alleviate situational anxiety, such as public speaking. Interestingly, cannabis cultivars, or strains, that are high in CBD and low in THC are better than other cultivars for alleviating depression. But when used over a long period of time, any kind of cannabis could make depression worse.  Although clinical trials in people haven’t yet been completed, there is very compelling “petri dish” evidence that CBD can reduce inflammation, for painful conditions such as Crohn’s disease, and fight some cancerous tumors. There is a massive amount of scientific research being done on CBD right now, and we are likely to see many medical breakthroughs in the next decade.
CBD oil contains CBD (and often other active compounds) in a carrier oil. There are a number of forms of CBD oil, including softgel capsules, tinctures, and under-the-tongue sprays. Some forms of CBD oil can also be applied directly to the skin, in the form of products like creams and salves. The concentration of CBD varies from product to product.
Cannabidiol is currently a class B1 controlled drug in New Zealand under the Misuse of Drugs Act. It is also a prescription medicine under the Medicines Act. In 2017 the rules were changed so that anyone wanting to use it could go to the Health Ministry for approval. Prior to this, the only way to obtain a prescription was to seek the personal approval of the Minister of Health. 
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