As you might know, both phobias and PTSD are marked by fear-related memories. According to a report published in 2017—titled, “Cannabidiol regulation of emotion and emotional memory processing: relevance for treating anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders”—by the British Pharmacological Society, several studies have confirmed that CBD reduces learned fear response in ways that could be helpful for patients suffering from phobias and PTSD. One study—titled, “Cannabidiol Regulation of Learned Fear: Implications for Treating Anxiety-Related Disorders”—in particular, details how CBD relieves fear response. The researchers found that it helps in three ways:
While you can cook with our cannabis oils, it is important to remember that we've done the hard work for you, and the oils are already decarboxylated. Further heating may cause degradation of the active cannabinoids, such as THC and CBD. Additionally, improper mixing of cannabis oil during cooking may result in under- or over-dosing, which can lead to undesirable effects (particularly with cannabis oils high in THC). Remember to keep the cooking/baking temperature below the carrier oil's smoke point, to preserve the integrity of the oil.
Selective breeding of cannabis plants has expanded and diversified as commercial and therapeutic markets develop. Some growers in the U.S. succeeded in lowering the proportion of CBD-to-THC to accommodate customers who preferred varietals that were more mind-altering due to the higher THC and lower CBD content.[57] Hemp is classified as any part of the cannabis plant containing no more than 0.3% THC in dry weight form (not liquid or extracted form).[58]
As you might know, both phobias and PTSD are marked by fear-related memories. According to a report published in 2017—titled, “Cannabidiol regulation of emotion and emotional memory processing: relevance for treating anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders”—by the British Pharmacological Society, several studies have confirmed that CBD reduces learned fear response in ways that could be helpful for patients suffering from phobias and PTSD. One study—titled, “Cannabidiol Regulation of Learned Fear: Implications for Treating Anxiety-Related Disorders”—in particular, details how CBD relieves fear response. The researchers found that it helps in three ways:
There are literally dozens of uses for CBD. Many people use it to help control anxiety and stress, and it also has powerful antibacterial properties. Clinical studies have also found CBD receptors play a significant role in many health and medical conditions, including multiple sclerosis, cancer, epilepsy and other seizure disorders, inflammation and immune disorders.
Yet even those who believe in this power recognize that CBD medicine remains largely unexplored: Treatments are not systematized, many products are not standardized or tested, and patients (or their parents) are generally left to figure out dosing on their own. While some suppliers and dispensaries test the CBD and THC levels of their products, many do not. “We really need more research, and more evidence,” Kogan says. “This has to be done scientifically.”

I first encountered CBD while on sabbatical a few years back. As I drove up the Oregon Coast Highway, it was hard to miss all the cannabis shops along the Pacific. I stopped in one, perused the menu, and selected two marijuana specials — Nine-Pound Hammer and Trainwreck — and some CBD gummy bears. The cannabis was, well, as advertised, and the CBD candy, as far as I could tell, was a fruit-flavored placebo.

While experts — including Cargile, Romanowski, and Carqueville — note that there hasn’t been a ton of research done on the potential risks of CBD oil, it’s thought to be a pretty low-risk product. “First of all, using anything topically reduces the risks right off the bat,” Cargile says. “There’s not a lot of research, however CBD and THC, cannabis and hemp have been used for thousands of years. And according to the Centers for Disease Control [and Prevention], which reports deaths in this nation, [marijuana] causes zero deaths every year so it’s found to be very safe.”

Preliminary research indicates that cannabidiol may reduce adverse effects of THC, particularly those causing intoxication and sedation, but only at high doses.[23] Safety studies of cannabidiol showed it is well-tolerated, but may cause tiredness, diarrhea, or changes in appetite as common adverse effects.[24] Epidiolex documentation lists sleepiness, insomnia and poor quality sleep, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and fatigue.[2]
Individuals are continuously suffering varying degrees of anxiety about death. We did a study on “An overview of Death Anxiety”, https://goo.gl/PvKvMJ. Method of concept analyses and an extensive online literature have been used for this study. Overall data provided evidence that anxiety about death is rife within western culture. Its prevalence, particularly with women and significant number of cases elderly people experience less death anxiety than young people.
×