The primary functions of ECS appear to be maintaining the body’s homeostasis and teaching the body to recover from stress. They are also effective in the endocannabinoids in different regulatory systems and, for example, reduce blood pressure, body temperature, pain and fear perception, regulate muscle tension and stimulus conduction in the brain and stimulate appetite and reward-behavior.

Bisogno T, Hanus L, De Petrocellis L, Tchilibon S, Ponde DE, Brandi I, Moriello AS, Davis JB, Mechoulam R, Di Marzo V: Molecular targets for cannabidiol and its synthetic analogues: effect on vanilloid VR1 receptors and on the cellular uptake and enzymatic hydrolysis of anandamide. Br J Pharmacol. 2001 Oct;134(4):845-52. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjp.0704327. [PubMed:11606325]


Unfortunately due to the disappointing and down right inaccurate position of the federal government in classifying Cannabis as a schedule one drug, most research institutions risk federal funding if they conduct real research on Cannabis. This has dramatically limited the potential for real research by real scientists to be conducted. That research is critical to better understanding the multitude of therapeutic effects of the various chemical constituents found in Cannabis.
Now let’s compare to an “average” concentration of THC in some of the cannabis flowers that we use to make our oil (we’re using whole numbers to make it easy to follow). For the sake of argument, let's say that we use flowers with a potency of 10% THC (on a fully decarboxylated basis). This means that each gram of cannabis flowers contains 100 mg THC (1 gram = 1000 mg, 1000 mg x 0.1 = 100 mg). Theoretically we would have to use 10 grams of flowers to equal 1000 mg of THC (which is what we have in our 50 mL bottles). But this process is not 100% efficient (nothing ever is!). So we have to account for extraction efficiency during cannabis resin production, plus losses from decarboxylation, dilution, and packaging.
The short answer: Using products with CBD oil — or CBD oil itself, for that matter — will not get you high. “CBD hemp oil is made from the flowers, leaves and stalks of hemp that contains high amounts of CBD, but low traces of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is commonly found in a cannabis plant,” Carqueville says. THC is the psychoactive element of marijuana.
All CBD products start out the same way: as an extract from the leaves and flowers of cannabis plants. At Green Roads, we only extract CBD from hemp, defined as any variety of cannabis plant containing less than 0.3% THC by dry weight. Cannabinoids and terpenes are produced by tiny glands on the leaves and flowers of cannabis plants known as trichomes. The compounds produced by these trichomes give cannabis both its rich aroma and its nutraceutical effects.
And the products on the shelf aren't all the same, Ward said. "There can be many, many different varieties, and if you're thinking about doing this for medical reasons, you want to find a trusted source and do your research," she said. "Where does that oil come from, and how confident can you be that you know the exact percentages of the different cannabinoids in the product?"
One of CBD’s chief properties is its anticonvulsant nature. Clinical trials have shown that CBD is effective at reducing seizures in children, and the FDA is likely to approve Epidiolex, a pharmaceutical-grade version of CBD for this use, in summer 2018. Although CBD has been documented as an antiepileptic since 1881, CBD’s anticonvulsant mechanisms still remain unclear. Not enough studies have been conducted to understand this relationship fully. One possible explanation for CBD’s neuroprotective effects is its interaction with NMDA receptors, which play a key role in the overly active neuron activity that is a hallmark of epilepsy.
According to the National Eczema Association, “Cannabinoids represent an exciting prospect for the future of AD therapy. With measurable anti-itch, anti-pain, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties, the effect of cannabinoids in patients with AD has already begun to be demonstrated.” (10) Cannabinoids can be found in both cannabis oil and CBD oil.
The legality of smoked cannabis and oils differs by state, with some allowing only one or the other. Likewise, some states only approved the plant for use in a limited capacity, such as for children with epileptic disorders. It continues to be classified as a Schedule I drug, making it illegal under federal stipulations. When produced from industrial hemp products, cannabis oil may be legal, but when created from a crop of medical marijuana, its status reverts back to illegal unless the state has provisions for it.
Although the exact mechanism and magnitude of effects of THC and CBD are not fully understood, CBD has been shown to have analgesic, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant, anxiolytic, neuroprotective, anti-oxidant, and anti-psychotic activity. This wide variety of effects is likely due to it's complex pharmacological mechanisms. In addition to binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors of the endocannabinoid system, there is evidence that CBD activates 5-HT1A serotonergic and TRPV1–2 vanilloid receptors, antagonizes alpha-1 adrenergic and µ-opioid receptors, inhibits synaptosomal uptake of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and gaminobutyric acid and cellular uptake of anandamide, acts on mitochondria Ca2 stores, blocks low-voltage-activated (T-type) Ca2 channels, stimulates activity of the inhibitory glycine-receptor, and inhibits activity of fatty amide hydrolase (FAAH) [1, 2].
Consumers report using CBD for a huge variety of health and wellness reasons, but a lot more research is needed to determine which symptoms and ailments it works best for. Currently, there are more than 40 clinical trials enrolling patients to examine the effectiveness of CBD for a variety of diseases, including substance use disorder, chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, schizophrenia, and many others. Most importantly, CBD is incredibly safe, and not addictive. Even young children can tolerate daily doses of up to twenty milligrams (20 mg) per kilogram (1 kg) of body weight (for a 175 pound adult, that’s more than 1,500 mg). The most common side effect of high-dose CBD is sleepiness.
"Emmerdale's Leah Bracknell reveals the shocking way she is breaking the law to stay alive. The star, who has terminal lung cancer, believes the drug she is making at home is slowing down the progress of her illness. She revealed she has used cannabis oil “high in THC” from the day she left hospital two years ago." https://www.mirror.co.uk/…/emmerdales-leah-bracknell-reveal…
Cannabidiol is currently a class B1 controlled drug in New Zealand under the Misuse of Drugs Act. It is also a prescription medicine under the Medicines Act. In 2017 the rules were changed so that anyone wanting to use it could go to the Health Ministry for approval. Prior to this, the only way to obtain a prescription was to seek the personal approval of the Minister of Health.
Now let’s compare to an “average” concentration of THC in some of the cannabis flowers that we use to make our oil (we’re using whole numbers to make it easy to follow). For the sake of argument, let's say that we use flowers with a potency of 10% THC (on a fully decarboxylated basis). This means that each gram of cannabis flowers contains 100 mg THC (1 gram = 1000 mg, 1000 mg x 0.1 = 100 mg). Theoretically we would have to use 10 grams of flowers to equal 1000 mg of THC (which is what we have in our 50 mL bottles). But this process is not 100% efficient (nothing ever is!). So we have to account for extraction efficiency during cannabis resin production, plus losses from decarboxylation, dilution, and packaging.
Full Spectrum CBD Oil contains some of the same terpenes as dried cannabis bud. Terpenes are the aroma molecules found in plants. Beta-caryophyllene (pepper) and myrcene (musk) are both been found in hemp oil.  According to recent research, beta-caryophyllene acts as a cannabinoid in the body. It engages some of the same cell sites as smoked cannabis. In particular, the terpene interacts with cell receptors that regulate the immune system.  Myrcene has been found to have antidepressant and anti-inflammatory effects. It also acts as an antioxidant and helps molecules move across cell membranes. The combination of essential fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants and healing terpenes make hemp oil one powerful superfood.
Even as the research proceeds, thousands of people are using CBD as medicine. A British pharmaceutical company, GW Pharma, has developed two CBD drugs: Sativex, which contains a 1-to-1 ratio of CBD and THC, and Epidiolex, which is pure CBD. The former is prescribed for the painful muscle spasms that occur in multiple sclerosis, while the latter is aimed at childhood seizures. Sativex is not available in the United States, but it is approved in 29 other countries, including Canada, England and Israel.
That doesn’t mean it’s completely risk-free, but the likely risks are more of the allergic reaction variety, Romanowski notes. “It is a component of an essential oil, and reactions are not frequent, but common in a small percentage of the population,” he says. “People should do a small patch test on their skin before generally applying the product over their body.”
1 Active Not Recruiting Treatment Fumarate Hydratase (FH)-Deficient Tumors / Lung Cancer Non-Small Cell Cancer (NSCLC) / Mesothelioma / Renal Cell Adenocarcinoma / Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) / Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Non-gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors / Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) / Tumors Harboring Amplifications in the cMyc Gene / Tumors Harboring Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) and IDH2 Mutations / Tumors, Solid 1
REM behavior disorder: REM behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia disorder characterized by shouting, becoming physically agitated, or otherwise acting out during sleep. For many, RBD is a symptom of a larger, more serious condition or disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease or PTSD. CBD oil minimizes the symptoms of RBD, and also alleviates the anxiety and painful symptoms that often accompany disorders that lead to RBD.
Pharmaceutical companies producing oils are subject to a pharmaceutical production licence for controlled drugs, issued by government regulators. Currently there are no pharmaceutical companies producing cannabis oil as a medicine. This might change in the future when a standardised, GMP-certified production method becomes available, setting the standards for the production of cannabis oil as a pharmaceutical product.
Consumers report using CBD for a huge variety of health and wellness reasons, but a lot more research is needed to determine which symptoms and ailments it works best for. Currently, there are more than 40 clinical trials enrolling patients to examine the effectiveness of CBD for a variety of diseases, including substance use disorder, chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, schizophrenia, and many others. Most importantly, CBD is incredibly safe, and not addictive. Even young children can tolerate daily doses of up to twenty milligrams (20 mg) per kilogram (1 kg) of body weight (for a 175 pound adult, that’s more than 1,500 mg). The most common side effect of high-dose CBD is sleepiness.

It is also illegal to market CBD oil as a dietary supplement.  This is because cannabidiol is not a food ingredient (dietary ingredient) and it doesn’t have an established safety profile or history of use in the food supply. If you see a CBD product, and it is labelled as a dietary supplement, then the company is either unaware or doesn’t care about the FDA’s current position that CBD is not a legitimate dietary ingredient.

CBD For Inflammation

×