CBD has powerful effects on the liver as well. Have you ever had a prescription that warns you not to take the medicine along with grapefruit? That’s because grapefruit inhibits certain drug-metabolizing enzymes in your liver, resulting in much higher levels of your medication in your bloodstream. CBD does the same thing, so it is wise to discuss your medication regimen with a doctor or pharmacist before engaging in CBD therapy.


Now let’s compare to an “average” concentration of THC in some of the cannabis flowers that we use to make our oil (we’re using whole numbers to make it easy to follow). For the sake of argument, let's say that we use flowers with a potency of 10% THC (on a fully decarboxylated basis). This means that each gram of cannabis flowers contains 100 mg THC (1 gram = 1000 mg, 1000 mg x 0.1 = 100 mg). Theoretically we would have to use 10 grams of flowers to equal 1000 mg of THC (which is what we have in our 50 mL bottles). But this process is not 100% efficient (nothing ever is!). So we have to account for extraction efficiency during cannabis resin production, plus losses from decarboxylation, dilution, and packaging.
In addition to acting on the brain, CBD influences many body processes. That’s due to the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which was discovered in the 1990s, after scientists started investigating why pot produces a high. Although much less well-known than the cardiovascular, reproductive, and respiratory systems, the ECS is critical. “The ECS helps us eat, sleep, relax, forget what we don’t need to remember, and protect our bodies from harm,” Marcu says. There are more ECS receptors in the brain than there are for opioids or serotonin, plus others in the intestines, liver, pancreas, ovaries, bone cells, and elsewhere.

CBD

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